'Get Out' And 'IT' Have Made 2017 The Biggest Year For Horror Films In History

They've out-earned the likes of The Blair Witch Project and The Exorcist

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It's been a great year for horror films, with the likes of It Comes At Night, Annabelle: Creation and Gerald's Game to name a few. Two releases which have particularly stood out are Jordan Peele's groundbreaking Get Out and the recent revamp of Stephen King's IT.

The former turned out to be the most profitable film of the year and the latter has taken $300m domestically and $600m worldwide so far. But how does this compare to how the iconic horror films of yore?

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The New York Times has analysed data from Box Office Mojo to find out the most profitable years for horror films and concluded that, thanks to Get Out And It, 2017 has been the biggest box office year in the history of horror films.

So far 2017 has raked in $733 million in ticket sales and as the NYT point out, "October is a golden month for horror and will surely add more to that tally."

Writer Mekado Murphy used data to demonstrate that the most successful years for horror films tended to coincide with the most popular horror film of that decade.

For example, 1973 was the biggest year of the seventies thanks to the release of The Exorcist which, "alone topped the collective total of any box office year in the decade."

Whereas for the eighties, "1987 was one of the decade's most profitable. Elm Street was in its third instalment ($44 million), The Lost Boys added young vampire thrills to the mix ($32 million) and the action horror of Predator (a movie that probably wouldn't have existed without the success of Alien) brought in strong numbers ($59 million)."

As for the nineties, "1999 brought a new revolution via The Blair Witch Project, a lowest-of-budgets found-footage movie shot on video that scared up a phenomenal $140.5 million, along with many copycats."

The aughts, "Began by coasting on a wave of Scream popularity. While that franchise added sequels, the 2000 parody Scary Movie pulled in $157 million."

Back in 2017 Murphy writes that, "The biggest story is the tremendous run of It" adding that "the adaptation perked up the domestic box office after a dismal August, and not even box office experts predicted just how well the movie would perform."

With the growth of streaming services like Netflix which react to genres becoming more popular, we're likely to see more money pumped into horror films and better releases as a result of it.