The Highlights From The Hearst Magazines EU Referendum Debate

Who will you vote for? This may help you decide

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Not since the runaway success of the Hokey Cokey have we ever been so obsessed with whether you're in or out. In the final week leading up to the historic EU referendum this Thursday, Hearst Magazines, Esquire's publisher, hosted a debate to encourage us to vote and help us pick a side.

Answering questions submitted by Esquire, Elle, Red, Cosmopolitan and Harpers Bazar, the half of the panel battling to Remain was made up of broadcaster June Sarpong and co-founder of Innocent Smoothies, Richard Reed. The Leave camp were represented by UKIP spokesperson Suzanne Evans and Chair of the Labour Leave campaign, John Mills.

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One area the audience were keen to talk about was how our relationship with Europe would change - Reed made the analogy that we couldn't poke Europe in the eye and expect the same trade deals and benefits from the union. Sarpong further illustrated the Remain campaign's desperation to keep strong ties with other European countries saying that it will be much more difficult for people from the UK to go live in places like Spain or France. "Wonderful schemes like Erasmus" she added "are possible for young people thanks to the EU. That will change if we leave."

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The Leave camp were quick to dismiss "scaremongering" claims from the other side that we would need a VISA to enter European countries if we were to leave. One question Esquire in particular wanted to know was how leaving might change our exchange rate with the Euro.

Remain were keen to stress it would suffer and Leave surprisingly agreed but added that "It will make your holidays abroad more expensive but it will mean economic growth." Probably not the best slogan to use at Gatwick airport.

Property was another divisive issue. Sarpong argued that the "Housing crisis is due to failure of this country to build enough housing, not immigration" which lead to Suzanne Evans scoffing loudly and John Mills to respond thus:

The debate ended with a rallying call for young people. 18-25s are the most likely not to vote and the generation who should really care the most. Reed argued the decision was more important and lasting than a general election and was a chance to see real democracy in action. Better make sure you get down and vote on Thursday then. 

Watch the full answers to each question here:

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