Tinder Knows How 'Desirable' You Really Are, And They're Keeping A Record Of It

As if internet dating wasn't humiliating enough

It turns out that not only are we getting heavily judged on our Tinder pics, bio and overall chat by other Tinder users, but Tinder itself is rating and recording our 'desirability' levels.

Not only that, but they using that score to match us with people whose desirablity is similair to our own.

Tinder's CEO Sean Rad told Fast Company that the rating system is known as an 'Elo score,' which is quite literally based on how hot you are, your education, work and 'swipe history.'

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"It's not just how many people swipe right on you. It's very complicated. It took us two and a half months just to build the algorithm because a lot of factors go into it," he explained.

If, like us and every other honest human, you're curious about your score, you'll be disappointed to learn there's no way of finding it out.

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The VP of Tinder's product has compared the new algorithm to the system of World of Warcraft.

"I used to play a long time ago, and whenever you play somebody with a really high score, you end up gaining more points than if you played someone with a lower score. It's a way of essentially matching people and ranking them more quickly and accurately based on who they are being matched up against."

Basically, if you get your desirability score up, you will be matched with other more desirables.

Tinder data engineer Tor Solli-Nowlan explains to Fast Company that it isn't a universal ranking: "People are really polarised on even just a photographic level: Some people really favour facial hair, while some do not. Same thing with tattoos, photos with pets or children, excessive outdoors shots, or photos of you with a tiger."

Welcome to romance in 2016, everyone.

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via cosmopolitan.com.au