Expert Hangover Cures From People Who Really Should Know

Suffering from a bank holiday hangover? Check out these miracle cures

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The Doctor –Dr Francis works in A&E at a large teaching hospital in London

"As doctors, we've got a whole pharmacy at our disposal. One friend used to call ahead to the ward, so the nurses could get his hangover cocktail ready. It was one of the nutrition drinks you give to malnourished patients, which is like eight cheeseburgers in one glass, with paracetamol and anti-sickness pills. There's also the saline drip. Once, after a drinking session at med school, I put a line in my vein and let it run while I slept. I got a whole litre of fluid during the night and felt absolutely perfect in the morning. For non-doctors, I'd recommend a milkshake. It coats the stomach and replaces sugar and water simultaneously. In terms of over-the-counter medication, antihistamines have been shown to have some effect, also ibuprofen, although it can make nausea worse."

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The Chef – Lawrence Keogh is head chef at The Wolesley

"If I've had a big night, I love a bacon and egg roll with HP Sauce and a big mug of tea. The important thing is lots and lots of black pepper on the egg to boost your immune system. At Roast, we see a lot of City boys coming in during the week looking a bit worse for wear and they always go for the big Full Borough. Everyone knows what a Full English is but the Full Borough is all about quality ingredients. I get the black pudding and bacon from Ramsay of Carluke in Ayrshire, Scotland; they give the bacon a lot of TLC and a lovely smoky cure. It crisps up gorgeously. There's nothing like a bit of grease for a hangover." Lawrence Keogh is the head chef at Roast, Borough Market, London

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The Barman – Giuseppe Ruo from The Wellesley Hotel

"The worst hangover I ever had was two days before my wedding. I drank a shot of this kind of mythic cocktail for barmen, usually we call it The Voodoo Recipe, and I was a brand new person. According to legend, the Creole people used to make it with marijuana herbs and sugar. I use the flower of the anise plant, soaked in a litre of grappa and then I add sugar and boil till it's reduced to one third. That's only for the worst hangovers, though. For a more average one, I'll have a Bloody Mary made with grappa, a little bit of honey, spices and tomato juice. The flavour's not the best, but the effect is perfect."

The Acupuncturist – Jonquil Westwood is a member of the British Acupuncture Council

"In acupuncture there's a point on your hand known as The Great Eliminator. If you push your thumb up against the index finger you'll see a bulge, the point is in the middle of that. Applying pressure there is good for lots of hangover symptoms, such as headaches, and I also use it for detoxification because it has an effect on your intestinal system. Also, if you stretch out your arm with your palm upwards, you'll see you've got two tendons coming down the middle of your wrist. There's a point between those two tendons, about 2in up from the crease of your wrist. If you apply pressure there it should relieve nausea."

The Pilot – Dave Waring is a former RAF pilot

"Nowadays the Aviation Authority guidelines are very strict - the old adage is eight hours bottle to throttle - but during the war there were times when you'd expected to have the day off, maybe been down the pub, then found out you were flying. The trick in those situations was a quick blast of oxygen. In most aircraft there's a mask connected to a supply of 100 per cent pure oxygen. It relieves the symptoms rather than curing anything, but it's enough to get you home. The Germans used a drink called Underberg - a brown liquid you could buy in little bottles at some exorbitant price for a real kick-start to the system. It tastes foul, though."

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