Revealed: The Official List Of Booziest Countries In The World

Surprisingly, Britain doesn't even make the top ten

You know what they say: a problem compared is a problem halved.

Or to put it another way: if you're worried about how much booze we drink in Britain, just take a look at the sorry soaks in Moldova.

Or indeed Belarus, Lithuania, Russia or the Czech Republic – all countries who put away more litres of alcohol per year, per person than we do.

Using 2010-2015 data compiled by the World Health Organisation, a company called Voucher Cloud has made a list of the countries in the world with the hardest drinking habits.

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The top ten contains some of the usual suspects – everyone knows Russians (4th) gargle with vodka each morning and the taps in Australia (10th) pump out weak lager instead of water.

But our own absence from the drinking big league (we languish in 17th) is something of a surprise – either a pleasant or mildly disappointing one, depending on how mature your outlook – leading to the inevitable question: what the hell does a provincial high street in Andorra look like if it's more treble-rum-and-sick-splattered than our own?

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Other findings in the report include the unsurprising news that America – a country whose young people devise complicated games designed to actually slow down their drinking, rather than knocking it back as fast as possible standing around in a damp wood somewhere – is ranked 49th in the world.

Even further down the scale are the sensible people of Kuwait and Pakistan who apparently drink a mere 100ml of alcohol - or single bottle of wine - a year on average.

That's your normal, quiet Tuesday night in spaced over 365 days, people. The world is fascinating and diverse place indeed.

The boozing top ten:

  1. Moldova, consuming 17.4 litres per year, per person
  2. Belarus, consuming 7.1 litres per year, per person
  3. Lithuania, consuming 16.2 litres of pure alcohol per year, per person
  4. Russia, consuming 14.5 litres per year, per person
  5. Czech Republic, consuming 14.1 litres per year, per person
  6. Ukraine, consuming 13.9 litres per year, per person
  7. Andorra, consuming 13.8 litres per year, per person
  8. Romania, consuming 12.9 litres per year, per person
  9. Serbia, consuming 12.6 litres per year, per person
  10. Australia, consuming 12.6 litres per year, per person