Because denim and cycling don't mix

Now that we're all cycling again (or at least attempting to) the big question becomes, what do we wear when we're doing it? As anyone with a worn through pair of denim will know, it's not ideal to wear when pedalling. And seeing as we're not fans of lycra, we need an alternative. Which is why we spoke to Abe Burnmeister of Outlier, a company specialising in clothes that can take us from the saddle to the office.

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Are certain materials and cuts more suited for cycling than others? If so, which ones?

The huge thing is the materials, traditional trouser fabrics just aren't designed to handle the sort of repetitive stress that pedalling puts on clothing. Your legs are spinning at about 80 revolutions a minute, which means the fabric is rubbing on your saddle more than once every second. Even a beefy cotton denim is going to fall apart quickly under that stress and we've had customers send us incredible pictures of blown out jeans.

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Our fabrics can handle that abrasion, but your average cotton, wool and even polyester trousers are going to fall apart quickly if you are biking a lot. In terms of cuts, the main problem area is the crotch and seat of the trousers. If you use a Four-Way stretch fabric it's not a big deal, but with regular fabrics you'll be a lot more comfortable in a gusseted cut. On a few styles of bikes it might be smart to go with a slim leg to avoid getting caught in your chain, but with the right bike that shouldn't be an issue.

How do you avoid looking like the stereotypical lycra loving cyclist?

It's easy, don't wear Lycra cycling gear!

What can happen to my regular clothes if I wear them repeatedly whilst cycling?

Well the biggest thing is that you'll wind up soaking wet if you get caught in an unexpected rain shower.
With trousers it depends on how your body is built, most people are going to destroy their trousers if they cycle in them regularly. Traditional trouser fabrics just can't handle spinning and rubbing against a bike saddle.