How to Wear Linen Without Looking Like a University Lecturer

When the temperature eventually rises, your wardrobe choices will inevitably need to evolve. Linen is a material that until now has had many sartorial stigmas attached - ridiculed elderly Latin teacher, flustered-looking Englishman abroad - but with smart choices and proper care it can be a good option as the season changes.  

The benefits in warmer weather are that it has a much lower thread count than cotton, allowing it to breathe more. It can also hold up to 20% moisture before it feels damp. Nice.

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Linen also has a low elasticity and does not spring back as readily as cotton, which is why it becomes wrinkled easily. To avoid this keep pieces hung at all times and press with a warm iron to combat unruly creasing.

When using linen this spring you really have three options:

1 Linen Knitwear

Whilst most linen pieces come in the form of suiting and tee-shirts, there are also great options in knitwear. Linen can be blended with cotton or wool in varying strengths, which results in garments gaining all the benefits of the material whilst still retaining the feel of knitwear.

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Choosing a jumper with a large percentage of linen will allow skin to breathe, making it a great transitional piece as we move towards summer. Try this Our Legacy crew neck knit with a simple short-sleeved shirt and shorts and you're sorted for warm days and nights.

2 Casual Jacket

Linen can also work really well with more casual jackets and simply swapping out some spring basics for linen options can give more interest and also ensure you remain comfortable. Win win. Try pairing a more casual blazer and a simple tee or short-sleeved shirt, but avoid 'double linen' at pretty much any cost. Try this J. Crew linen blazer with a block-colour striped tee.

3 Tailored Linen

Firstly, a summer suit in a lighter fabric and colour. This unstructured linen suit from Richard James exhibits all the benefits of the material whilst avoiding that disheveled Englishman abroad look.