Here Are The Quotes That British Politicians Are Regretting After Trump's Election

Backbenchers and backtrackers

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It was only as late as January this year that British MPs were debating whether Donald Trump should be allowed to step foot in the UK, in light of his claims that certain areas of London had become "so radicalised" by Muslims that the city's police force were "afraid for their own lives."

In hindsight, it would have been a teensy bit awkward if that particular bill had passed. The Donald, of course, defied all odds and won the American election, leaving many backtracking politicians in an unenviable position.

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Here, we preset just a selection of politicians' public opinions over Trump that have swayed in the past few weeks:

David Cameron, former Conservative Prime Minister:

Before Trump's election: "I think his remarks are divisive, stupid and wrong and I think if he came to visit our country I think it'd unite us all against him."

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After Trump's election: Silence.

Theresa May, Conservative Prime Minister:

Before Trump's election: "'I can assure you that Donald Trump has got it absolutely wrong. The police in London are not afraid to go out and police the streets. [...] Politicians should be very careful as we are dealing with the issue of terrorism, as we fight terrorism, we need to be bringing communities together. Bringing greater cohesion in communities, not seeking to divide."

After Trumps' election: "I would like to congratulate Donald Trump on being elected the next president of the United States, following a hard-fought campaign. Britain and the United States have an enduring and special relationship based on the values of freedom, democracy and enterprise. We are, and will remain, strong and close partners on trade, security and defence. I look forward to working with President-elect Donald Trump, building on these ties to ensure the security and prosperity of our nations in the years ahead."

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Jeremy Corbyn, Labour Party Leader:

Before Trump's election: "We manage to have a coherent, multifaith, multicultural society in London, in Birmingham, in Leicester, all parts of this country. He's welcome to come and see. He might learn something."

After Trump's election: "It would be wrong of us to not remember that Donald Trump and his campaign did tap into real problems - stagnating or falling wages, underfunded public services, insecure work and insecure housing, and years of being left behind or neglected in post-industrial America. […]One thing is for sure: neither billionaire Donald Trump nor the billionaire-backed Tories have any interest in giving people back control or reining in the predatory excesses of a globalised free-for-all."

Nicola Sturgeon, First Minister of Scotland

Before Trump's election: "I'm not going to try and beat around the bush here. I hope America doesn't elect Donald Trump. I hope it elects Hillary Clinton. I also think it would be a really good moment to see America elect its first female president.[...] Would I be proud if Donald Trump became President? No."

After Trump's election: "I never want to be, I am not prepared to be, a politician that maintains a diplomatic silence in the face of attitudes of racism, sexism, misogyny or intolerance of any kind. I hope that president-elect Trump turns out to be a president very different to the kind of candidate he was and reaches out to those who felt vilified by his campaign. But people of progressive opinion the world over, I think, do have to stand up for the values of tolerance and respect for diversity and difference."

Boris Johnson, former Conservative Mayor of London:

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Before Trump's election: "I think he's betraying a quite stupefying ignorance that makes him frankly unfit to hold the office of President of the United States [...] The only reason I wouldn't go to some parts of New York is the real risk of meeting Donald Trump."

After Trump's election: "I think there's a lot to be positive about. It's very important not to prejudge the president-elect or his administration. It's only a few days since the election has taken place. I think we all need to wait and see what they come up with but I think we should regard it as a moment of opportunity."

Sadiq Khan, Labour Mayor of London:

Before Trump's election: "Donald Trump's ignorant view of Islam could make both of our countries less safe - it risks alienating mainstream Muslims around the world and plays into the hands of extremists. Donald Trump and those around him think that Western liberal values are incompatible with mainstream Islam - London has proved him wrong."

After Trump's election: "It's no secret that I'm no fan of Donald Trump or the way he has conducted his campaign, but he has clearly won the US presidential election. The campaign divided America — and the world — and emotions are understandably running high. I hope Donald Trump will now do everything in his power to unite people and bring divided communities back together. I wish him well."

Nigel Farage, acting leader of UKIP (and first British politician to meet President-elect Trump):

Before Trump's Election: "You know, there are lots of things in this campaign that I couldn't support in any way at all and nor do I … But I spoke to people who were, Trump voters – [they were] going to vote Trump in this election, and do you know what? – they couldn't care less. They couldn't give a damn what Trump says, who he offends because they see him as their weapon against the establishment and they see Hillary as being the epitome of that establishment."

After Trump's election: "Mr Trump's support for the US-UK relationship is very strong. This is a man with whom we can do business.[…] I'm especially pleased at Mr Trump's very positive reaction to idea that Sir Winston Churchill's bust should be put back in Oval Office"